10 Most Positive Words Of Different Languages

There is an old adage that claims: “The number of languages you know is the number of people you are worth." Just imagine how incredibly valuable is it to know the most positive words in any language! The people who created The Word Point (website for translation of 40+ languages) certainly know the importance of this, so you can even contribute by translating your own!

Inspired by their example, this time around we have compiled together an amazing list of ten most positive words of different languages. They are a magical example of how people around the globe create a beautiful vocabulary to express the beautiful ideas and feelings that are the building blocks of their world.

10 Most Positive Words Of Different Languages

10 Most Positive Words Of Different Languages

Pirgun (Hebrew): this is one of those feelings that make people who feel them truly exceptional humans. If you are feeling “pirgun" (also sometimes encountered as “firgun"), it means that you are feeling great happiness and deep pride for someone else’s accomplishment, without being jealous or holding a grudge against them. It is certainly a very positive feeling and one we should all be able to develop.

Morgenfrisk (Danish): as you might be able to guess from its spelling, this is a morning word – “morgenfrisk" describes that lovely feeling of being completely rested after a good night’s sleep. Considering how fast-paced our modern world is, it is nice to know that people still notice and appreciate this little joy in life!

Solarfri (Icelandic): this word denotes a very peculiar little holiday. In Iceland, employees might be unexpectedly given a free afternoon, or the entire day off, when the weather is particularly sunny and warm. Imagine being given time off work just to enjoy the sunshine! If that does not make for a positive office life, then nothing does.

Retrouvailles (French): This is a word for a reunion (with your family or your loved ones) after being apart for a long time. Even more than the English “reunion", it also carries the meaning of a wonderful surprise: literally, it means “rediscovery".

Ukiyo-e (Japanese): the literal translation of this word, “floating world", will probably convey nothing to the mind of a non-Japanese person. However, it is brimming with positive philosophy. Ukiyo-e describes a person who lives in the present moment and lets all the minor distractions and life’s little grievances just roll right out of their field of attention. These people appreciate every minute and never take anything for granted.

Forelsket (Norwegian): this word has been invented to describe one very particular feeling, or rather a phase of a feeling. It is meant to pinpoint that odd giddiness you get along the way to falling in love – when you are already past the stage of having a crush on the person, but you still have not reached the point of actually saying “I love you."

Cafune (Brazillian Portugese): yet another wonderful word inspired by love, this refers to the act of tenderly running your fingers through your lover’s hair.

Shinrin-yoku (Japanese): yes, this is a single word. The Japanese have come up with a name for the activity of going into the woods in order to calm down your mind and soothe yourself when the going gets tough. The literal translation would be “forest bathing".

Zindabad (Urdu): This is a word of Persian origin. It is mostly used as a cheer, but it has another lovely little use: if you say it right after a person’s name, it turns into a well-wishing expression, a way to wish someone longevity and health, and it literally means “long live."

Sonrisa (Spanish): sounds oddly similar to “sunrise", right? However, the actual meaning of the word is “smile". This is probably not a coincidence since they both definitely bring light and warmth to people’s days.

Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, people around the globe reserve their most positive vocabulary for the small things in life: a nice day, spending time with family, or just smiling. It goes to show that no matter what may be happening in the world, we never really forget what the important things are. The Danish “hyggelig", roughly translated as “coziness", is a wonderful example of this which recently took the Internet by storm. Do you have your own candidate for the “most positive word" in your language? Let us know!

Erica Sunarjo graduated from South Texas College majoring in Marketing and Creative Writing. She used her knowledge to make a difference in the realm of business copywriting and invested heavily in traveling and language learning. At present, Erica is fluent in French and Spanish, studying Chinese and working her way to being a multilingual copywriter. She keeps track of the latest trends in IT and technologies, blogs about efficient strategies in education and business coaching, holds educational webinars.

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