Positive expression

How to Write the Greatest Speech Ever

Write the Greatest Speech Ever

Writing a speech is a challenge. Writing the greatest speech is an even bigger challenge. When you want to talk, it means you have something to say. You have a message you want to convey. And many times you must be able to convey that message. But how to write the greatest speech ever?

Delivering a speech is full of emotions. Even the most experienced public speakers have emotions when they speak. And it’s normal. When you give a speech, a group of people who want to be inspired listen to you. And this pressure to say something valuable to your listeners creates emotions.

But there is a trick with which you can significantly reduce the emotions of speech. This trick is to write your speech in advance. And an even better trick is to memorize that speech. Of course it’s good to leave a place for improvisations.

It is good to know this trick, but how do we write the speech. How to write a good speech. Moreover, how do we write the greatest speech ever? Fortunately, there are some tricks here as well. Little secrets that if introduced, the speech becomes a powerful inspirational message. Find below a list on how to write the greatest speech ever:

How to Write the Greatest Speech Ever

1. Add Power Words To Your Speech

Add between 8 to 10 strong words to your speech in a conscious and intentional way. Check a list of positive words and take some strong words from it and add them to your speech. Write the speech around these words. Repeat these strong words several times during the speech. People remember only a few words at the end of a speech and those are usually the strong words repeated more often.

2. Add Sentences To Be Remembered

Add around 3 to 4 sentences to be remembered by the audience. Intentionally add between 3 to 4 sentences during the speech in order to be memorized and remembered by the public. Include in these sentences some of the power words you have chosen. Do not put the sentences all in the same place or all at the end as a conclusion. Scatter the sentences to be memorized during the speech. Intentionally think about these sentences and write them separately before you start writing your speech.

3. Write From The Heart

Write about 40% of your speech from your heart. The rest can be informational and with things that have been heard before. This 40% will give your speech a vibe full of authenticity. The remaining 60% write it with information that most people know so that you can be relatable and give more value to the authentic parts of the speech. Be bold with your authentic side. Say exactly what you have to say.

4. Write The Speech Structured

Write the speech structured in 3 parts: introduction, middle-content and conclusion. Try to structure your middle-content in 3 large parts. Write in such a way that it is clear what the introduction, the middle-content and the conclusion are. In the introduction, attracts the public’s attention through an intelligent and inspirational statement, but also says things such as the purpose of your speech and who you are. In the end, try not to conclude the whole speech, it is better to write one of the key sentences that you want people to remember. Also at the end be careful to introduce a part in which you tell the audience how to continue on their own the research for the topic of speech.

5. Use a Genuine Sense of Humor

Humor in a speech may or may not be beneficial. Don’t put jokes made by people that you do not personally know in your speech. The best jokes are the authentic jokes that already exist in your family. Those jokes that no one but you and your friends know. Mention who you were making that joke with. The joke in speeches is better received when you say: my mother joked with me and told me, my father joked with me and told me, my friends and me used to joke and say. But be very careful not to be perceived as racist, mean, stupid or boring. Limit the jokes to 2, maxim 3 per speech.

6. Don’t Thank The Audience

Many people advise you to thank the people who listen to you. But Toastmasters, the world’s largest network of people who learn to speak in public, makes it clear in their textbooks not to thank the audience in your speech. You can thank the organizers or mentors who taught you something. In this way you make the edification of the organizers and mentors who in return build you up. When you thank the organizers and mentors you increase the value of your speech and when you thank the audience you decrease the value of your speech.

7. Frame Your Speech In Time

Every speech has a time in which it must be said. Make sure you know the time you will speak and write your speech for that time. If you have to talk for 10 minutes then you will write another type of speech. If you have to talk for an hour then you will need to write a different kind of speech, in more detail. It is very important that before you start writing a single word in the speech, you know the time of the speech. Whatever time you have for the speech, keep the same structure and follow the same rules that are described above.

Conclusion

Writing a great speech requires practice. You have to accept that the first speech you write will not be the greatest. But with practice you will improve considerably. Writing your own speech is super awesome. You’ll see. You will feel that you have a voice, that you have something important to say. You will start to feel listened, right from the moment you start writing your speech. Somehow as you write your speech you seem to begin to see the people who will listen to you, and you already feel listened to.

Congratulations on wanting to express yourself. Freedom of expression is a great gift of the age we live in. Always remember that in the past people were not allowed to express themselves authentically. So have courage and speak authentically. Speak from your heart. Because you are allowed and we all want to hear your message.

Positive Words Research – How to Write the Greatest Speech Ever

30 Believable Excuses for Being Late to College or School

30 Believable Excuses for Being Late to College or School

Have you ever got in trouble because of being late to college or school? If you are an unpunctual individual, you should be able to explain the reasons for your tardiness to your professor and make him trust your words. Check a list of the believable excuses, which you can use next time when you will not be able to come on time. Buy thesis paper at Thesisgeek where experts will assist you with writing a paper and surprise your teacher.

Believable Excuses for Being Late to College or School

Being late to class

If you want to use one of the following excuses, you should be a good liar. You should know how to control your tone of voice, facial expression, and body movements. Even more, you should be able to play a drama just like a talented actor does.

Alicia Wilson, product manager at RatedbyStudents, states: “When I worked at the high school, students never ceased to surprise me with the new original excuses for being late. However, I trusted only those individuals, who told me about their personal troubles and seemed to be sincere.” So, you should make yourself believe in your excuse if you want your professor to believe it too.

You had problems with transport:

  1. Your car or your parents’ car was stuck in traffic.
  2. You had an accident and needed medical help.
  3. Your car was snowed and you had to dig it up.
  4. You were forced to drive very slowly because of the ice-crusted ground.
  5. Your car didn’t want to start for an hour.

You helped other people

  1. You witnessed an accident and tried to help injured.
  2. Your pet fell ill and you waited for a vet.
  3. You saw a lost child and called the police and social service.
  4. You found a lost puppy or a kitten and took it to your house to feed.
  5. Your neighbors’ house caught on fire, so you tried to help them as much as you can and called the fire department.
  6. Your family member got ill and you took him to the hospital.

You had problems at home:

  1. You lost your keys and couldn’t leave your home.
  2. The door lock in your house was broken and you had to wait for a locksmith.
  3. You were stuck in the broken elevator.
  4. Your dog ran away from home and you looked for it.
  5. You quarreled with your parents and cried for a long time.
  6. Your little brother or sister injured his\her leg and you helped your mom to stop bleeding.

Other issues

  1. You fell asleep in the public transport and missed your stop.
  2. Your got blisters from your new shoes your, so you couldn’t go as fast as you usually do.
  3. Someone robbed you in a public place.
  4. You celebrated your birthday yesterday and, for this reason, you overslept in this morning.
  5. Your alarm-clock broke down and didn’t wake you up.
  6. You lost your purse with all your money and credit cards.
  7. You have to take a pill because of your chronic disease, but you forgot to do it in the morning, so you had to come back home to take your medication.
  8. Your cheek was swollen, so you had to go to the dentist.

Being late for assignment submission

Being late to class is bad for your reputation. However, when you are not able to meet a deadline for an important essay or project, then things get even worse. You risk losing both: the trust of your professor and an opportunity to get good grades.

If you are in trouble and have no time to complete your assignment, you should better check a list of the writing services and get academic assistance. It will help you to submit tasks on time and save your positive image of a hardworking student.

However, if you don’t follow this advice, you should explain to your professor why you were not able to complete the assignment on schedule. In this case, it’s better to say that you had problems with your health, which didn’t allow you to study effectively.

Health-related issues

  1. You had a sharp headache\stomachache\toothache.
  2. Now you are taking new pills, which provoke weakness, drowse, and sickness.
  3. You had food poisoning.
  4. You injured your arm, leg or back because of the ice-crusted ground (if you hurt your leg, don’t forget to walk with a hobble).
  5. You had a fever.

Final Thoughts

You can have a lot of real reasons to be late for college or school almost every day, but still, you should try to be a punctual person. If you respect the time of your professor and of your peers, you shouldn’t distract them from the learning process by entering a class in the middle of the lecture.

You are welcome to utilize these believable excuses when you really need them. However, you shouldn’t use them too often, if you don’t want to lose trust in a relationship.

BIO: Daniela McVicker is an editor for AllTopReviews. She worked at the high school for 3 years and helped young individuals to develop their writing skills. In her spare time, she composes poems, reads books in foreign languages and bakes delicious cakes.

Lemons Into Lemonade: How To Turn Negative Events Into Positive Expression

Lemons Into Lemonade: How to Turn Negative Events into Positive Expression

The fact is, many of us rely on creating to express our emotions. All of us on are especially familiar with this process. Creating to express our emotions in any form has potential to be a healthy and life-giving experience.

We can use art and creative writing as a means to turn our negative feelings into a reckoning for positivity. Here are some thoughts about negative experiences and how we can write them into a corner when they try to bully us.

The Dangers of Holding in Our Pain

Our culture glorifies the idea of holding in your emotions. Men are often called weak for being expressive, and women are called crazy for expressing their emotions in any way. Neither of these is fair, as emotions are simply a part of the human experience, and there’s nothing weak about admitting to what you feel.

Here’s the fact: suicide rates are on the rise. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the suicide rate in the United States increased 24 percent from 1999 to 2014. The amount of adolescents — and we are talking early adolescents — that contemplate ending their lives or do end their lives as a result of cyberbullying has increased as well. In a recent UK study, 26 percent of respondents had suicidal thoughts, as a result of cyberbullying.

We have to normalize emotions and offer people practical ways to handle their trials in life. Even social work professionals admit we need to start thinking out of the box. I propose one of the best outlets for pain is through creative writing.

Write It Off

There is something so satisfying about forming the perfect sentence to describe what you’re going through. As long as you’re doing it for you and not to impress others, I think being able to work hard on this transfer from mind to paper is therapeutic. By writing about your negative experiences, you can process them, and learn from them. If you’re comfortable with it — share and relate it to others.

Here are some suggestions to turn your negative experiences into lemonade, through the power of writing.

Poetry Exercises

Poetry, lyric writing, and the like are the best places to employ your artistic license, due to the common “show don’t tell” mentality that’s so popularized in these communities. I personally find it useful to use poetry prompts in order to challenge yourself. The point of doing these exercises is to force you to write down your thoughts in a different way than just “I feel sad” or “I am angry.” You also are usually writing less — but it’s harder to get a good flow going. It’s a new form of expression for a lot of freelance writers and similar creatives and can influence your other writings as well.

Descriptive Nonfiction

This is something I struggled with originally due to my past writing song lyrics with metaphors. I had to drop all of that — which I now consider being mostly fluff — and switch to describing the actual scenes around me. Descriptive nonfiction lives in “show don’t tell,” more strictly than poetry does.

Retell your story. Use color, shape, and other physical descriptions. How red was your face from embarrassment or hurt? What were other people doing? How they moved, their facial expressions, and how did their face change and move as well? What words were they using? Of course, “show don’t tell” can also make for a traumatic retelling of a hard time, so gauge yourself and see if you can handle it first.

Letters to Yourself

Years ago, during one of my first breakups, I found myself writing letters late before bed. These letters were addressed to me, oddly enough. I never called it journaling or felt like I was writing a diary. I was very clearly writing a letter. Even though I was the recipient of these letters.

Physically writing my thoughts down on paper felt like I was transferring my emotions — like they were physically leaving my body. This was one of my initial experiences with the therapeutic effects of writing, and since then I’ve used writing to help myself through other breakups, loss of friends and family, and stressful life events.

Freewriting

It has been said that “bad writing is good for you,” and this may certainly be the case in your situation. Freewriting offers the comfort of no restrictions – just straight up word vomit until you need to eat again.

Some find this to be a positive and freeing experience. It offers them a way to put some elbow grease into releasing their emotions, but they don’t have to worry about anything else. This isn’t typically the writing you show people, but certainly, you can if you would like. It’s your lemonade.

Get a Little Abstract

Use weird prompts and exercises — and by “weird” I mean unusual to you — to stretch your writing and give you new ways to express yourself. The thing with writing prompts is that they work like writing games. You have to use them to finish a piece based on rules and restrictions you don’t typically adhere to. Some of the most satisfying pieces of writing I’ve done have been based on odd prompts, and it always feels like a new way to express my thoughts, feelings, and beliefs.

How To Encourage Others

As I mentioned earlier, we need to normalize negative emotions. Make them something to talk about, and make it usual to talk about them. Let’s innovate a bit and give struggling people healthy and positive ways to handle their pain.

We must live by example first, because telling people to talk about their issues doesn’t shut out the voices — external or internal — that make them feel uncomfortable doing so. Being encouraging and transparent, ourselves, can do that.

Now, how much more as a writer can we share our experiences tangibly, especially with other writers? We all struggle with life, so writing them down for others may actually give them something to lean on, and maybe vice versa. Make your own lemonade from life’s hardships.

Ultimately, transparency begets transparency

With that in mind, let’s strive for honesty and humility with each other, so we can destigmatize depression, formulate it into something positive, be it through writing or whatever other form of creation you choose, and gain something from it rather than lose everything to it.

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How have you used writing or creativity to cope with bad experiences? Let me know in the comments below!

Author’s Bio

Avery T. Phillips is a freelance human being with too much to say. She loves nature and examining human interactions with the world. Comment or tweet her @a_taylorian with any questions or suggestions. Avery lives in the United States.

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