Present moment

How Spirituality & Mindfulness Increase Positivity

spirituality

Focusing on one’s personal spirituality, practicing mindfulness and honoring self-care are known for naturally increasing positivity in your life. These three different acts can seem a bit ambiguous to those who are unfamiliar with the terms. This may be due to the fact that they can have many different meanings to different people, which is why they are personal to your own journey.

Spiritual traditions such as prayer, meditation, yoga, and journaling are meant to nourish the soul and allow time for self-reflection. Mindfulness is becoming more consciously aware of your thoughts and emotions in the present moment. Self-care is intentionally restoring your mind, body, and soul with activities such as disconnecting from the outside world, making yourself a cup of tea or treating yourself with a massage. Whatever act of self-service that helps you to reconnect with yourself with your own being and revive your inner light is good.

Physical Benefits

Our present-day culture tends to feed into the need to be fast-moving and overly productive. Refocusing your attention to your inner-self has the ability to positively transform your physical body, especially after a day of hard work. Using nothing more than your breath and focus, meditation has shown to greatly reduce stress and stress-related conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, and fibromyalgia. If your work allows for you to escape to focus on your personal wellness, be sure to do so — even for as little as five minutes a day. Also, be sure to take advantage of communicating grievances to your manager. You’ll be surprised at how much more motivated and productive you’ll feel, after being honest.

Much like comparing a smoker to a non-smoker, personal choices and habits have an impact on our physical health and our ability to heal our own bodies. Healthcare-related research studies have found that having a connection with spirituality or religion helps ill patients better cope with stress and improves their quality of life. Giancarlo Lucchetti led a study that found that individuals with a strong spiritual connection have an 18 percent reduction in early mortality. This serves as evidence that establishing a spiritual life now may potentially prolong your life.

Positive Self-Image

The mind and body are inextricably connected. Treating the mind and body as a holistic system will aid in creating an overall positive self-image. When your physical body feels healthy and well, so does your mental health and vice versa. Practicing acts of self-care enable you to reinforce positive self-image by accepting that you deserve the best out of life. Self-care does not have to always look the same each time. Integrating routine exercise into your life’s schedule or simply looking at yourself in the mirror and saying the words “I love you” is as intensely impactful as treating yourself to something nice or going on vacation. By treating yourself with love and kindness you are simultaneously manifesting positivity and welcoming it into your life.

Start Young

A large percentage of a young person’s time is spent in school receiving their education. Integrating mindfulness practices into a child’s school day has proven to have many positive impacts. Millions of dollars have been invested into studies on the positive effects of mindfulness practices on students with results showing improved sleep, increased retention rates, and lower anxiety levels. Mindfulness practices not only have positive impacts on them at the time of the practice but the effects carry on throughout schooling into higher education. In one study by the University of California Santa Barbara, it was discovered that integrating mindfulness practices reduced mind-wandering, which helped to improve scores on the reading comprehension portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Adapting intentional practices that benefit your mind, body and soul will naturally allow positivity to find you and influence your life. The positive outcomes will spill over onto those who surround you, creating a waterfall effect on all aspects of your life. Welcome and embrace mindfulness, spirituality, and self-care into your everyday routine — at work, school and at home. Every movement, encounter, and thought is an opportunity to intentionally be positive in the present moment.

Author’s Bio

Avery T. Phillips is a freelance human being with too much to say. She loves nature and examining human interactions with the world. Comment or tweet her @a_taylorian with any questions or suggestions. Avery lives in the United States.

Here at Positive Words Research, we are looking to share with our readers original content that hasn’t been published on other sites so if you are comfortable with Positive Words Research being your sole publisher, we are more than happy to share with our readers your inspiring and empowering story.

5 Habits to Help You Stay in the Present Moment in Everyday Life

in the present

Living in the present is a goal most people have tried to re-commit to, but it’s a lot easier said than done. Most of us spend a lot of our time reflecting on the past (the good and the bad) and planning or worrying about the future. The ability to stay in the present moment is rare, and it takes a lifetime of practice.

Rare are the times we’re truly aware of the awesome moments as they unfold. It’s why most people say their wedding day and other major events “fly by.” Fortunately, for some events, we know how important it is to have photographs and videos. Hence the massive wedding industry advertisements. It’s great to preserve those memories, but they’re still in the past.

How can we actually stay in the present moment on a daily basis?

Here are five habits to help you hone present-moment living and shake off the negativity that can come with trying to stay in the present moment or future:

1. Actively take note of what’s happening at the moment

Tapping all your senses including the tastes, smells, textures, what you hear and what you see is one of the best ways to pull yourself back to the present. It isn’t easy. However, the influx of experiential marketing showcases that as humans we’re hungry for full-sensory experiences. We’re so used to just energizing a few senses that the others are desperate for attention. Throughout the day, take note of what your senses are discovering, and you’ll be whisked to stay in the present moment.

2. Try meditation

Meditation isn’t easy and “true meditation” means you’re living in the moment with zero to minimal distractions. There’s a reason meditation guides will so often remind you that, “If you feel yourself getting distracted, simply acknowledge it and bring yourself back.” We’re both in need of more sensory experiences and always trying to distract ourselves.

Meditation doesn’t require any special equipment, and you don’t need to force yourself to sit for hours in vain. A few minutes per day, preferably in the morning and night, is a great help. There are also countless tools from candle gazing to guided tapes.

3. Tackle your technology addiction

Most of us struggle with some form of technology dependence. Download an app that keeps track of how often you check your phone to give yourself a reality check. Make a pact with loved ones that when you’re together during certain events, such as dinner or a date, phones are on airplane mode.

Technology is a major distraction and can do more harm than good when we depend on it too much. How can you lessen technology usage in your life?

4. Get in touch with nature

Whether you live in a metropolitan or a rural area, you’ll be able to find green spaces that help you get centered. Check out parks, nearby trails, or take short day trips to the great outdoors. Forest bathing is a way of connecting with nature on a deeper level. Leave the phones at home and make yourself aware of the awesomeness of your surroundings. Nature is a natural antidote to living in the past or future.

5. Start writing

Whether it’s starting a journal or writing a handwritten letter to surprise a loved one, writing forces our brain to focus and slow down. Our brains tend to work faster than our hands, which is why so many studies have shown that writing things down helps us remember them better than typing.

For a double whammy, write positive affirmations and work towards cognitive reconditioning of your self-talk. Penmanship is also a fading skill, and if we don’t use it, we lose it. Focusing on bettering penmanship is an easy, accessible, and fruitful goal that also has calming and meditative properties.

Living in the present isn’t a resolution that requires waiting until the New Year. Know that you’ll slip up, but making it an active goal on a daily basis will get you closer to living a calmer, more joyful life. What can you do right now to make the most of this moment?

About the Author

Trevor is a freelance writer and recovering addict & alcoholic who’s been clean and sober for over 5 years. Since his recovery began, he has enjoyed using his talent for words to help spread treatment resources and addiction awareness. In his free time, you can find him working with recovering addicts or outside enjoying about any type of fitness activity imaginable.

Here at Positive Words Research, we are looking to share with our readers original content that hasn’t been published on other sites so if you are comfortable with Positive Words Research being your sole publisher, we are more than happy to share with our readers your inspiring and empowering story.