Order of Arithmetic Operations – What is the PEMDAS Rule?

A simple arithmetic expression consisting of two numbers connected through a single arithmetic operation is easy to solve. But when it comes to solving expressions with several numbers and multiple operation symbols, it becomes necessary to solve them in some sequence. But to know which particular operation to solve first, we need some rules. PEMDAS rule is the order of operations used to solve complex arithmetic operations. PEMDAS is an acronym used to specify the order of operations to be followed while solving expressions having multiple operations.

PEMDAS is an operation order sequence that is used to solve expressions with two or more operations. The acronym PEMDAS stands for parenthesis, exponents, multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction. The order of operation guided by this is in the same sequence as the order of letters in PEMDAS.

PEMDAS stands for:

  • P- Parentheses
  • E- Exponents
  • M- Multiplication
  • D- Division
  • A- Addition
  • S- Subtraction

Orders of operations are essential to understand the operational sequence to follow while solving complex expressions. There are many different names and acronyms used to specify the orders of operation in different parts of the world. In Canada, the acronym used for the order of operation is BEDMAS, which stands for Brackets, Exponents, Division, Multiplication, Addition, and Subtraction. Other acronyms for the same order of operation are GEMDAS, where G stands for grouping, and BODMAS, where B stands for Brackets, and O for Order or Off.

Learning order of operation provides a guideline to evaluate the expression, so we always have the same solution for any expression. Both Mathematics and Computers use these order or operation guidelines. Understanding the concept of order of operations rules such as PEMDAS is vital for all the students as it forms the basis of understanding maths at every level in life and students must establish a clear understanding of this concept from an elementary stage.

For students to gain the fluency of solving mathematical problems involving multiple operations it is important that they do a thorough practice of this concept. If they fail to implement the basic knowledge of the order of arithmetic operations, it becomes difficult for them to learn maths. There are several ways to teach students this important concept, interestingly, like fun classroom activities, games, puzzles, and interactive math worksheets. These additional activities and resources are an effective means of teaching kids in elementary stages.

Arithmetic Operations

Children in their early stage learn better through various activities and games. Combining fun with learning can be very beneficial for teaching kids the order of operations. Conducting quizzes or fun activities which involve the kids working in teams to solve certain clues can be a great way to teach kids. Such activities help students better understand the order of operation and develop their cognitive and team-building skills. You can conduct quizzes in the form of games also.

Another efficient way to teach the children anything is using visual aids as children are quite curious to learn new things and retain information through visualized learning. Visual tools such as engaging games, interactive worksheets, and apps make it easier for kids to visualize the concepts and understand them better. Learning and visualizing the concepts with the help of programming is another effective visual tool where kids can learn new concepts by writing code to visualize.

CONCLUSION

Learning the mathematical skill of arithmetic operations is very important and vital for any child’s math learning. Making children learn this concept by understanding and visualization is important. Interactive teaching methods can help students to understand this concept without any problem. It is also helpful in making math learning fun and interesting for children.

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