How to Increase Downloads with Mobile App Promotional Videos for App Store and Google Play

You’re developing a mobile app and you’re sure it will be successful. But what’s the most effective way to tell the world about it? Let’s assume that you still have a month or two before launch. How can you create the most demand and excitement around your app’s release?

You could focus your efforts on your app’s website, or spread the word on social media. But even the best website copy and the most amazing tweets can’t build up demand and get people excited as much as a great promotional video can.

Promotional videos convey emotions better than any other type of content. A great promo video generates hype and gives your potential users — and the press — something to talk about even before your product appears on the market.

But video is important for more than just pre-release hype. A promotional video on the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store can significantly boost app downloads. According to experiments by SplitMetrics, which took into account data from over 10 million users, video previews can increase conversion rates for mobile app downloads from 16 to 110 percent.

I don’t know anybody who’s against promotional videos out of principal. But I know a lot of people who won’t shoot a video because it’s too hard, too expensive, too time-consuming, or simply because they don’t have a good camera.

These are not good excuses. In reality, creating a promo video isn’t nearly as hard as it seems. Plus, there are lots of great examples you can look to for inspiration.

We’ll highlight some great app promotional videos. But before we do that, let’s take a look at Apple’s and Google’s rules for short video previews in their respective app stores.

App Video Preview on Apple App Store

[App Video Preview on Apple’s App Store. Image source: Hetzel.net]

Google Play’s and Apple App Store’s app preview rules

All promotional videos featured in the Google Play store must be uploaded to YouTube and then linked to in the Play store.

Apple’s App Store requires you to upload a video directly. Additionally, all App Store promotional videos must be approved by Apple. It takes around 24 hours for a video to be accepted (or rejected).

Google Play is clearly the winner when it comes to app localization. The play store can automatically show subtitles in any language you support. You can even create a completely different promo video for every country your app is marketed in without any hassle.

Apple’s App Store allows you to use only one language. This means that it’s especially important on the App Store to visually demonstrate your app’s functionality.

Google Play allows you to feature a video of any style that’s between 30 seconds and 2 minutes in length. The App Store, on the other hand, limits your creativity, allowing you to only show screen capture videos between 15 to 30 seconds in length. You can read more about app video preview rules here.

App video preview on Google Play

[App video preview on Google Play. Image source: Androidcentral]

Now we’ll talk about two types of video that can increase conversions on your app store product pages — screen capture and live action.

Screen capture

Screen capture videos — or as I like to say, “how to use it” videos — are the simplest style of promotional videos your can produce. As we’ve just mentioned, this is also the only style of video that the App Store accepts.

All you need to make a screen capture video is a screen recording app for your iOS or Android device. Apple recommends their QuickTime Player as a video recorder. But you can also check out AirServer for both iOS and Android, or Rec., AZ Screen Recorder, and Ilos screen recorder for Android.

When you record a video, make sure you do it in landscape orientation. Otherwise, you’ll end up with a lot of blank space on the sides of your video. Awkward.

When your recording is done, you can add music and a voiceover that explains the app’s functionality. You can find a voice that fits the style of your brand on gigi marketplaces like Fiverr, where prices — as the name suggests — start at just five bucks.

Here’s  an example of Mint Bill’s (iOS) screen capture promo video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUuxy9O5i34

While a screen capture video can easily explain your app’s functionality and is simple to create, it lacks emotion. If you really want to get people to spread the word about your app, you need to tell a story. Thankfully you can do that on Google Play using a live action video.

Live Action

Even though live action videos can only be featured on Google’s Play Store, a great video on YouTube can drive app downloads in both stores.

Showing a real life situation in your video is more effective than showing a device’s screen because you can illustrate not only how the app works, but also tell the story of the idea behind the app.

Stories give your product personality while also convincing people that you know what you’re doing. If well-produced, a live action video can be a major channel for attracting users.

In a live-action video, the app is typically a “hero” that gives people superpowers in real-world scenarios. But you can be more creative than that.

The promotional video for Todoist on Google Play doesn’t focus on the app’s functionality at all. Instead, they tell a story about the lives of different people using Todoist to achieve their daily goals. Todoist managed to convey their brand’s value by evoking emotions rather than describing how their app works.

Promotional videos like Todoist’s make your company memorable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OAtFIpPxpU

While the style of video that Todoist created may cost a fortune, there are many cheaper ways to create a live action video.

The video we created for Yalantis’s My Day Countdown Timer app mixes screen-captured footage from the app with live action shots incorporating music, voiceovers, and touchspot animations to showcase the app’s features.

Producing this video didn’t cost much, but we brilliantly described a real-life situation that appeals to the app’s target audience — young girls. We also added an element of surprise for viewers to remember and talk about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zHWH1U7XMw

Producing a video is like producing any other type of content — it requires talent and effort. Here are a few tips for you to make an effective video for the App Store and the Google Play Store.

How to make promotional videos that increases your app downloads:

  • Keep your video short. Remember that an app preview is more of a teaser than a tutorial
  • Be user-centric. Anticipate possible questions and concerns and respond to them in the video
  • Show the app in action. Pick out one use case and explain how your app app takes a user from point A to point B.
  • Show the problem that your app solves. Sometimes it’s great to highlight how complicated life is without your app.
  • Stress the app’s benefits and show what makes your app different
  • Don’t overcomplicate your video. A video should convey one clear message to its target audience.
  • Be creative. Even the simplest video that explains how your app works can go viral if you’re creative.
  • Include a call to action at the end of the video.

Author

Kate AbrosimovaKate Abrosimova, Content Marketing Director at Yalantis (mobile application development company).

Kate loves building brands and writing about mobile technology, product development, and marketing.

How Do Your Thoughts Create Your Reality? ~ Nassim Haramein

Today I discovered this revealing scientific video about how do our thoughts create our reality and I am sharing it on Positive Words Research. This is a discussion between Nassim Haramein & Foster Gamble from a “Thrive Together” event with our friends at Thrive Movement. Special thanks to HeartMath for the use of clips from their video. Here is the video How Your Thoughts Create Reality?. This video is only 2:45 minutes long but it will completely change your perspective about the power of your thoughts. My recommendation for you is to develop a habit of consciously adding positive words in your thoughts… daily if possible.

Elena D. Calin
Positive Words Research
Download my books for free: Magic Sparkles of Happiness | Leader versus Manager | Hortensio and The Magic Stories

Together

Nassim Haramein posted publicly today: “A visual metaphor for the entire universe: everything is connected by the structure of space itself, even if it is not apparent to us on the surface…“. This affirmation was accompanied by the below picture representing trees with strong roots connected and the word together. I love this representation of the reality we all live in. We look around and see the things and our mind tell us that we are separate. We look at out bodies and think we are separated. But in reality, in every second, we are not separated, we are connected. This knowing brings me peace.

Together

Nassim Haramein is the Director of Research for The Resonance Project which made the movie The Connected Universe.

Source of the picture: Facebook Nassim Haramein Profile

Think Connected,

Elena D. Calin
Positive Words Research
Download my books for free: Magic Sparkles of Happiness | Leader versus Manager | Hortensio and The Magic Stories

Positive Words Can Change Your Brain

words can change your brainThe positive words you choose to use can literally change your brain.

While researching about positive words this article came up: “Speak with kindness: How your words literally restructure your brain“. From this article you can understand the followings:

Dr. Andrew Newberg, a neuroscientist at Thomas Jefferson University, and Mark Robert Waldman, a communications expert, have written together the book, “Words Can Change Your Brain.” In this book, they write, “a single word has the power to influence the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress.” When we use positive words like “love”, “peace” and “loving-kindness”, we can modify our brain functions by increasing cognitive reasoning and strengthening areas in our frontal lobes. Using positive words more often than negative words can activate the motivational centers of the brain, propelling them into action.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, when we use negative words, we are preventing certain neurochemicals from being produced which contribute to stress management. So, when we allow negative words and concepts into our thoughts, we are increasing the activity in our brain’s fear center (the amygdala), and causing stress-producing hormones to flood our system. These hormones and neurotransmitters interrupt the logic and reasoning processes in the brain and inhibit normal functionality. Newberg and Waldman write, “Angry words send alarm messages through the brain, and they partially shut down the logic-and-reasoning centers located in the frontal lobes.”

An excerpt from their book tells us how using the positive words can literally change our reality:

“By holding a positive and optimistic [word] in your mind, you stimulate frontal lobe activity. This area includes specific language centers that connect directly to the motor cortex responsible for moving you into action. And as our research has shown, the longer you concentrate on positive words, the more you begin to affect other areas of the brain.

Functions in the parietal lobe start to change, which changes your perception of yourself and the people you interact with. A positive view of yourself will bias you toward seeing the good in others, whereas a negative self-image will include you toward suspicion and doubt. Over time the structure of your thalamus will also change in response to your conscious words, thoughts, and feelings, and we believe that the thalamic changes affect the way in which you perceive reality.”

A study done by Positive Psychology further elaborates on the effects of using positive words. A large group of adults aged 35-54 were asked to write down three things that went well for them that day, including an explanation of why. This exercise is also called “the gratitude and appreciation journal”. Over the next three months, their degrees of happiness continued to increase, and their feelings of depression continued to decrease, even though they had discontinued the writing experiment. By focusing and reflecting on positive language, thoughts, feelings, and emotions, we can improve our overall well-being and increase the functionality of our brain.

What words do you choose to focus your energy on? If you notice your life isn’t exactly “happy,” try carrying a journal with you, for a week, to keep track of how often you use positive words. Then insert your written thoughts in our online free application Positive Words Researcher and check the words you have used in your thinking in the last week. The online tool also gives you a list of positive words not thought of you, so you can learn new ones and improve your positive thinking.


Researching more about positive words the next article came up: Words Can Change Your Brain.

The author of this article start with a funny affirmation: “Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words can change your brain. That’s right.”.

From this article, you can understand that positive words can “alter the expression of the genes”, “propel the motivational centers of the brain into action” and “build resiliency”.

In comparison with good words, “angry words send alarm messages through the brain, and they partially shut down the logic-and-reasoning centers located in the frontal lobes,” write Newberg and Waldman in the book “Words Can Change Your Brain”.


Researching, even more, another article came up: How Do Words, such as Yes and No, Change Our Brains and Lives?

This author of this article writes about the neuroscience of language, consciousness, and communication. One of the conclusions written in the article is ” to modify Compassionate Communication in a fundamental way: when conversing with others, we should limit ourselves, whenever possible, to speaking for 20 or 30 seconds, for even a single sentence can contain more than 4 chunks of information. When we limit ourselves to this 30-second “rule,” the brain quickly adapts by filtering out irrelevant information. There’s another advantage to speaking briefly: it interrupts our ability to express negative emotions.”


More article to sustain the fact that positive words can change your brain:

The brain dictionary ~ Where are words located in the head?

Where exactly are the words located in your head? What is the brain dictionary? Scientists have created an interactive map showing which brain areas respond to hearing different words. The map reveals how language is spread throughout the cortex and across both hemispheres, showing groups of words clustered together by meaning. The beautiful interactive model allows us to explore the complex organisation of the enormous dictionaries in our heads.

Explore the brain model for yourself and read the paper “Natural speech reveals the semantic maps that tile human cerebral cortex”.

And also more information can be found in this article published in the Guardian: “Neuroscientists create ‘atlas’ showing how words are organised in the brain”.