Five Words to Define Travel

 

I love traveling, and I love languages, so imagine my excitement when I came across a treasure trove of the trip words that describe how we feel before, during, and after we travel.

These five words for travel will define your feeling for traveling.

travel

Just like a photo can’t adequately catch what it feels like to stand on the edge of a fjord, neither can ‘wanderlust’ fully reveal how we feel when we desire our next venture. These travel words are literary treasures which have been selected from languages around the world. From Japanese to Swedish, Latin to Greek, travel brochures of the future will be peppered with travel words like of resfeber, Solivagant, and Sehnsucht.

Without further ado, here are five words for travel to add to your vocabulary.

 

  1. Resfeber (n.)

Pronounced: RACE-fay-ber

Origin: Swedish

Meaning: This travel word belongs to the restless race of the traveler’s spirit before the adventure starts when anxiety and joy are tangled together.

We’ve all felt this, the jump in your heart moment when you officially purchase your plane tickets. When the excitement and fear flood to your soul all at once, creating a healthy mixture of passions that can leave you feeling anxious or physically ill.

 

  1. Solivagant (adj.)

Pronunciation: sO-li-‘vA-gant

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Wandering alone.

Not all those who roam are lost, but all those who walk alone are solivagant. From the Latin word solivagus, meaning lonely or solitary, solivagant describes anyone who enjoys meandering around new countries, apart, to take it all in.

 

  1. Sehnsucht (n.)

Pronunciation: zeɪnˌzʊxt

Origin: German

Meaning: A nostalgic longing and desire in the soul for voyages past and eternity.

One author explained it as the “inconsolable longing in the personal heart for we know not what." Another related it to “a longing for a far-off country, but not one which we could identify."

When you’re not traveling this can be a powerful feeling, or when you think about the journey you’ve done, and you crave you could relive it all over again.

 

  1. Dérive (n)

Pronunciation: de.ʁiv

Origin: French

Meaning: An impulsive and unplanned journey where the traveler leaves their life behind, allows themselves to be guided by the landscape and architecture.

Elucidated as “drift," dérive is the notion that even if you drift, you will end up on the best path. This could explain life in general, but it also reveals small journeys. When you’re wandering through a new city, and you just happen to walk on a path that takes you to great discoveries.

 

  1. Schwellenangst (n.)

Pronunciation: ‘shwel-en-ahngst

Origin: German

Meaning: Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new.

From schwelle (“threshold") and angst (“anxiety"), this word explains that feeling you get before deciding to set out on a new journey. Argh! Did I make the right decision?

Up to you!

 

Which travel words do you relate to the most? What others would you add?

Let me know using the comments section below.

Thanks for the read and I believe you enjoyed this post.

 

Author’s Bio

Buddy is a travel writer and the founder/main editor of http://mysticalroads.com . His passion for travel inspires him to seek new places, new adventures and sharing his travel experience to everyone. You can visit his website and also follow him on Twitter and Facebook

 

Here at Positive Words Research, we are looking to share with our readers original content that hasn’t been published on other sites so if you are comfortable with Positive Words Research being your sole publisher, we are more than happy to share with our readers your inspiring and empowering story.

 

 

15 Positive Words Untranslatable in English to Add to Your Vocabulary

15 Positive Words Untranslatable in English

Tim Lomas, Ph.D., a positive psychology lecturer at the University of East London, has gone see a conference at the annual International Positive Psychology Association symposium in Orlando in 2015. He came back inspired. The speaker, Finnish researcher Emilia Lahti, talked about the concept of sisu which means someone who has “extraordinary determination in the face of adversity."

“She was describing it as this psychological skill or quality that was very integral to Finnish culture and their identity." She presented how, despite being a Finnish word, it was an ability of all people, regardless of their native tongue that anyone could possess or cultivate.

He returned to England with an idea: To create a database of meaningful, positive words for feelings, character traits and relationships, expressed with words untranslatable in English. He wrote a paper on the topic published in The Journal of Positive Psychology that contained just over 200 words. The paper drew attention in the positive psychology and linguistics communities, and people began sharing their ideas for words to include in the database with Lomas. In 2016 The Positive Lexicography Project was born.

The next list presents 15 positive words that can not be translated in English:

 

  1. ‘Bilita mpash’ – it comes from Bantu , a language from Central and South Africa and it means a beautiful , blissful dream ( the opposite of a nightmare) .

  1. ‘Trouvaille’ – it comes from French and it is a correspondent for a lucky find , something good or valuable that you discovered by chance. Most of the times it is associated with clover because it is the symbol of luck.

  1. ‘Agape’ – it is a Greek word that is the feeling of selfless, unconditional and devotional love for someone it is something like love but in a different way of thinking.

  1. ‘Hachnasat orchim’ – it comes from Hebrew/Yiddish and makes you a person that brings guests and offer hospitality and respect to strangers. This is a popular way to live in those countrys.

  1. ‘Kæk’ – it is a Danish word and it suggests that someone is bold, cocky (not in a pejorative sense) with a gung-ho spirit.

  1. ‘Samar’ – it is an Arabic word that is used when you sit together in conversation with people at sunset or in the evening.

  1. ‘Suaimhneas croi’ – it comes from Gaelic and it means that you are feeling happiness or contentment for finishing a task. It is a sign of perseverance!

  1. ‘Nakama’ – it is a Japanese word for someone that is your best friend, someone you feel deep, platonic love for.

  1. ‘Yuán béi’ – it comes from traditional China and it is a sense of complete and perfect accomplishment.

  1. ‘Apramāda’ – it is an old Sanskrit word and it means moral watchfulness or awareness of the ethical implication of one’s actions.

  1. ‘Singurista’ – it is a Philippines word from a dialect called Tagalog , and it’s used for someone who would not initiate an action unless certain of obtaining the desire result.

  1. ‘Cafuné’ – it is a Brazilian word meaning the act of tenderly running one’s fingers through someone’s hair.

  1. ‘Wabi-Sabi’ – it is a Japanes word for a way of living that focuses on finding beauty within the imperfections of life and accepting peacefully the natural cycle of growth and decay.

  1. ‘Hyggeling’ – it is a Danish word , Its “literal" translation into English gives connotations of a warm, friendly, cozy demeanor, but it’s unlikely that these words truly capture the essence of a hyggelig; it’s something that must be experienced to be known. I think of good friends, cold beer, and a warm fire.

  1. ‘Sewa’ – is short for the word Kar Seva, which is a Sanskrit word meaning hands or work and service, to pay homage through the act of love. Seva is the labour done with love and performed in the service of others without expectations.

For more positive words check our web page http://positivewordsresearch.com/ and feel free to comment your words in the comment section! You can also find us on our Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/positivewordresearch/

 

 

Sagacious ~ Definition & Meaning

What is Sagacious?
Definition and meaning of Sagacious

Sagacious

Sagacious

having or showing keen mental discernment and good judgment; shrewd.

 

The above picture is created by Serenity from PositivelyPeacefulInspirations.

Serenity has written a poem about the word Sagacious.
You can read it at this link: Ode to the Sagacious Soul

Serenity recently published a compilation of positively peaceful poetry entitled: A Compilation of Spiritual Poetry: Serenity Sought within the Sanctity of the Silver Lining

Links for Purchase

Impassioned ~ Definition & Meaning

What is Impassioned?
Definition and meaning of

Impassioned

Impassioned

filled with or showing great emotion.

 

The above picture is created by Serenity from PositivelyPeacefulInspirations.

Serenity has written a poem about the word Impassioned. You can read it at this link: Impassioned Pursuit of Purpose

Esoteric ~ Definition & Meaning

What is Esoteric?
Definition and meaning of Esoteric

Esoteric

Esoteric

Intended for, or likely to be understood by only a small number of people with a specialized knowledge or interest.

 

The above picture is created by Serenity from PositivelyPeacefulInspirations.
Serenity has written a poem about the word Esoteric.

You can read it at this link: Solace within the Esoteric Echoes of Sacred Questioning