Beautiful Words That Express Unusual Feelings

Beautiful words that express unusual feelings are explained in the list below.

Beautiful words that express unusual feelings

 

Farouche

Pronounced ‘faroosh’, it’s an adjective of French origin. It means ‘sullen or shy in the company of others’. Though it’s something we all have to go through at some point of time, a farouche person isn’t comfortable opening up to people quickly.

For example: Though he is a farouche guy, he is a completely different person with animals.

 

Nonplussed

Pronounced ‘nonplust’, it’s an adjective of Latin origin. It means ‘surprised and confused and not knowing how to react’. We go through this when we receive news that we hadn’t expected in our wildest dreams.

For example: She was totally nonplussed when she came to know that she had got the scholarship.

 

Gushy

It’s an adjective that means ‘expressing approval in a very enthusiastic way’. Aren’t we all gushy when we know that we have landed our dreams?

For example: She was all gushy when he stood beaming in front of her with a ring.

 

Vicarious

It’s an adjective of Latin origin that means ‘experienced in the imagination, through the feelings or actions of another person’. This would be common occurrence for an avid book or movie lover.

For example: You think I don’t know how it feels to lose a loved one? What do you think I felt when Katniss lost Prim?

 

Idée fixe

It’s a noun of French origin that’s pronounced ‘ee-day feeks’. It means ‘an idea that dominates someone’s mind; an obsession’. This is very unusual and more serious than just an earworm.

For example: Schizophrenics have peculiar idée fixes that makes them suspicious of everything.

 

Quiescent

Pronounced ‘kwi-ess-uhnt’, it’s an adjective of Latin origin. It means ‘a state or period of inactivity’. We all need a quiescent break from our busy lifestyle every once in a while, don’t we?

For example: The winter was a quiescent affair compared to the hustle and bustle of summer.

 

Louche

It’s an adjective of French origin that’s pronounced ‘loosh’. It means ‘having a bad reputation but still attractive’. It’s a human tendency. After all, Eve chose the apple.

For example: Most teen girls have an infatuation for a louche celebrity.

 

Jejune

Pronounced ‘jijoon’, it’s an adjective of Latin origin. It means ‘naïve and simplistic’. We always have this one person in our class or office who is jejune, right?

For example: Every mother’s instinct is to think that her child is too jejune to be let out in the world.

 

Author Bio

Sandra is a budding blogger and writer who is fascinated by what words can do. She is passionate about helping out people and reaching them with her words.

 

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